Training a New Trick Using No-Reward Markers: Effects on Dogs’ Performance and Stress Behaviors

Naomi Rotenberg CUNY Hunter College
Abstract

The overall goal of modern dog training is to induce the greatest behavioral change with the least amount of undue stress to the canine learner. The possible advantages and potential pitfalls of using no-reward markers (NRMs) in dog training have been debated by scientists and trainers, but no empirical studies have been undertaken. In the current study, 27 dogs were trained during a single session to put their front two paws into a toy hoop immediately following the trainer’s verbal cue “hoop” . In the control (IG) group, dogs’ errors executing the trick were ignored, and in the No-Reward Marker (NRM) group, the dogs ’ errors were followed by a tone, which signaled the lack of a forthcoming reward.

 

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Inhibitory Control, but Not Prolonged Object- Related Experience Appears to Affect Physical Problem-Solving Performance of Pet Dogs

Abstract

Human infants develop an understanding of their physical environment through playful interactions with objects. Similar processes may influence also the performance of nonhuman animals in physical problem-solving tasks, but to date there is little empirical data to evaluate this hypothesis. In addition or alternatively to prior experiences, inhibitory control has been suggested as a factor underlying the considerable individual differences in performance reported for many species.

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Aging effects on discrimination learning, logical reasoning and memory in pet dogs

Abstract

In laboratory dogs, aging leads to decline in various cognitive domains such as learning, memory and behavioural flexibility. However, much less is known about aging in pet dogs, i.e. dogs that are exposed to different home environments by their caregivers. We used tasks on a touchscreen apparatus to detect differences in various cognitive functions across pet Border Collies aged from 5 months to 13 years. Ninety-five dogs were divided into five age groups and tested in four tasks:

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Der beste Freund seit 35.000 Jahren

Der beste Freund, seit 35.000 Jahren

Hunde könnten schon viel länger die besten Freunde des Menschen sein als bisher gedacht. Das zeigt die Untersuchung des Erbguts von rund 35.000 Jahre alten Wolfsknochen. Forscher hatten diese auf der nordrussischen Halbinsel Taimyr entdeckt.

Kategorie: Zoologie Erstellt am 22.05.2015.

http://science.orf.at/stories/1759148

Bisher dachte man, Hunde seien vor höchstens 16.000 Jahren aus Wölfen hervorgegangen. Ein Team um um Pontus Skoglund von der Universität Stockholm verglich nun das Genom des Taimyr-Wolfes mit dem von modernen Grauwölfen und Haushunden.

Dabei stellten die Forscher fest, dass der Taimyr-Wolf heutigen Hunden und Wölfen genetisch gleichermaßen ähnelt. Vermutlich habe sich der Taimyr-Wolf vom gemeinsamen Vorläufer der Hunde und heutigen Wölfe abgespalten. Kurz nach dieser Trennung seien dann die Haushunde entstanden.

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Biologist Drake helps answer key question in canine history

3D morphometric analysis of fossil canid skulls contradicts the suggested domestication of dogs during the late Paleolithic

Whether dogs were domesticated during the Pleistocene, when humans were hunter-gatherers, or during the Neolithic, when humans began to form permanent settlements and engage in agriculture, remains controversial.

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The “Canine Cooperation Hypothesis”

Tracking the evolutionary origins of dog-human cooperation: the “Canine Cooperation Hypothesis”

At present, beyond the fact that dogs can be easier socialized with humans than wolves, we know little about the motivational and cognitive effects of domestication. Despite this, it has been suggested that during domestication dogs have become socially more tolerant and attentive than wolves. These two characteristics are crucial for cooperation, and it has been argued that these changes allowed dogs to successfully live and work with humans. However, these domestication hypotheses have been put forward mainly based on dog-wolf differences reported in regard to their interactions with humans. Thus, it is possible that these differences reflect only an improved capability of dogs to accept humans as social partners instead of an increase of their general tolerance, attentiveness and cooperativeness.

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Zuschauen und Lernen – Soziales Lernen bei Hunden und Wölfen

Zuschauen und Lernen – Soziales Lernen bei Hunden und Wölfen

Range, F. and Virányi, Z. (2013): Observing humans and conspecifics: social learning in dogs and wolves.  Froniers in Psychology, 4,  Article 868, doi:10.3389/fpsych.2013.00868

Forscherinnen des Messerli Forschungsinstituts an der Vetmeduni Vienna verglichen das soziale Lernverhalten der Wölfe mit dem der Hunde. Ziel dieser Studie war die Klärung der Frage, ob die sozialen Fähigkeiten des Hundes, die bei der Mensch-Hund Interaktion zu beobachten sind, während der Domestikation entstanden sind oder ob bereits Wölfe diese Fähigkeiten hatten.  

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Long-Term Health Effects of Neutering Dogs

Comparison of Labrador Retrievers with Golden Retrievers

Our recent study on the effects of neutering (including spaying) in Golden Retrievers in markedly increasing the incidence of two joint disorders and three cancers prompted this study and a comparison of Golden and Labrador Retrievers. Veterinary hospital records were examined over a 13-year period for the effects of neutering during specified age ranges: before 6 mo., and during 6–11 mo., year 1 or years 2 through 8.

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